About Maria Brann

Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

With the COVID-19 pandemic still in full force, people continue to talk about how it affects daily living, what can be done to return to “normal,” and whether vaccination is the answer. In this analysis of more than 7 million Read More
Communication by Key Leaders With so many changes happening with COVID-19 protocols, it is not surprising that many people are confused or uninformed. This is especially true for individuals with school-aged children as each school is often tasked with coming Read More
The American Medical Association (AMA) strongly endorses COVID-19 vaccination and in an attempt to help improve vaccination rates, they are providing important information about the dangerous Delta variant. AMA Chief Health and Science Officer Mira Irons, MD, and AMA Board Read More
On July 15, Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy issued his first public health advisory warning that misinformation about COVID-19 is an “urgent threat” to public health. He called for individuals, particularly social media users, and tech companies to fight against Read More
The foci of communication about COVID-19 and its vaccine from different areas and groups has been diverse, with some communication leading to positive outcomes and others leading to less desirable outcomes. In this analysis of the World Health Organization’s communication Read More
Not only are people dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, but because of social media, they are also dealing with the COVID-19 infodemic. Two studies this week explore Twitter to assess topics, sentiments, and misinformation on the social media platform. In Read More
Determining what is keeping people from being vaccinated against COVID-19, and how to communicate more persuasively to encourage more people to get vaccinated, is essential to getting the pandemic under control. This is true among all groups of people. In Read More
Because large percentages of people avoid vaccination because of hesitancy, studies are trying to better understand vaccine intention so that communities can reach herd immunity. This is not just  a local concern but a global problem. In this analysis of Read More
Health professionals around the world are encouraging people to get vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccine once available and eligible. However, communities are faced with increased rates of vaccine hesitancy, which may deter goals to get a certain percentage of the Read More
This week’s review focuses on the strategies, channels, and messengers to use for effective COVID-19 prevention messages. This study found that the channel from which people get their information about COVID-19 and vaccinations likely influences their level of vaccine hesitancy. Read More

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