Derricks, Veronica: Developing an Intervention to Improve Clinicians’ Delivery of Targeted HIV Prevention Communication to Black Adults

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Derricks, Veronica: Developing an Intervention to Improve Clinicians’ Delivery of Targeted HIV Prevention Communication to Black Adults

Submission

 Title:

Developing an Intervention to Improve Clinicians’ Delivery of Targeted HIV Prevention Communication to Black Adults

Authors:

Derricks, Veronica, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis; Adam Hirsh, Department of Psychology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis; Marianne Matthias, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine

Abstract

Background/Significance/Rationale: Although past research endorses interventions, such as information targeting, to improve communication around HIV prevention, more recent work shows that targeting health communication (e.g., by highlighting racial disparities in HIV rates) can undermine Black adults’ outcomes (attention to the message and trust in the message provider) via concerns about being racially stereotyped or negatively judged. In this work, we developed and refined a set of messaging strategies that clinicians can use to improve the delivery of targeted HIV prevention communication to Black adults.

Methods: We conducted structured interviews with 18 Black adults and 12 primary care physicians from Indianapolis to obtain feedback about our researcher-developed messaging strategies. These strategies were refined after actionable, consensus-driven feedback. Physicians also reported their preferences regarding a clinician training program on how to deliver these messages in primary care settings.

Results/Findings: Feedback from our structured interviews elucidated ten messaging strategies that were reviewed favorably, including: recognizing that all groups (not just Black Americans) are susceptible to HIV infection, acknowledging factors, such as racism, that also contribute to HIV disparities, and providing a rationale for targeted communication that expands the dimensions on which recipients are targeted (e.g., their health goals). Moreover, physicians identified several factors that would facilitate engagement in a training program.

Conclusions/Discussion: Findings provided critical feedback that informed the development of a messaging intervention to improve clinicians’ delivery of targeted HIV prevention communication to Black adults. Physician feedback also informed a training program that will teach clinicians how to deliver these messages in their practice. We are currently assessing the preliminary efficacy of the intervention messages (relative to usual care messages) with an online sample of Black adults (data forthcoming).

Translational/Human Health Impact: This work is an important first step in designing communication that can be used to cultivate trust and promote more equitable health care delivery to Black patients.

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|2022-08-31T17:24:25-04:00August 23rd, 2022|2022 Annual Meeting Presentations|Comments Off on Derricks, Veronica: Developing an Intervention to Improve Clinicians’ Delivery of Targeted HIV Prevention Communication to Black Adults

About the Author:

James Dudley

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