Hodges, Matt: Associations of Mental Health Measures and Retention in a Community-Based Perinatal Care Recovery Support Program for Women of Childbearing Age with Substance Use Disorder

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Hodges, Matt: Associations of Mental Health Measures and Retention in a Community-Based Perinatal Care Recovery Support Program for Women of Childbearing Age with Substance Use Disorder

Submission

Title:

Associations of Mental Health Measures and Retention in a Community-Based Perinatal Care Recovery Support Program for Women of Childbearing Age with Substance Use Disorder

Co-Authors:

Hodges, Matt, Indiana University School of Medicine; Joanna Chambers, Indiana University School of Medicine; Scott Denne Indiana University School of Medicine; Sarah Wiehe Indiana University School of Medicine, Regenstrief Institute; Qing Tang Indiana University School of Medicine; Seho Park, Indiana University School of Medicine, Regenstrief; Debra Litzelman Indiana University School of Medicine, Regenstrief.

Abstract

Background/Significance/Rationale: Substance use disorder (SUD) is associated with numerous adverse maternal and child health outcomes. Low retention rates are a barrier for many programs intended to care for individuals with SUD, but the causes behind these low retention rates remain understudied, particularly among women of childbearing age.

Methods: 184 women of childbearing age with a history of SUD were enrolled in a community-based peer recovery program. Half of participants were pregnant or postpartum. The outcome of interest was retention in the program, measured at two and six months. Participants were paired with a peer recovery coach (PRC). PRC were women with a personal history of SUD who assisted with healthcare system navigation, facilitated access to local resources, and provided advice and emotional support. All PRC were also licensed perinatal community health workers. Independent variables included gestational status, depression, anxiety, type and frequency of substance use, childhood trauma, abuse, readiness for treatment, and attachment patterns.

Results/Findings: Anxiety was found to be a key factor associated with retention. Moderate anxiety was associated with higher rates of retention compared to normal to mild anxiety. Severe anxiety was associated with lower rates of retention compared to normal to mild anxiety. Attrition was highest in the first two months.

Conclusions/Discussion: Severe anxiety was a barrier to program retention. Low retention rates in the severe anxiety group reflect care-avoidant patterns of anxiety, as opposed to the more typical care-seeking patterns of anxiety seen in the moderate anxiety group. Alleviating anxiety should be prioritized and more research is needed regarding severe anxiety and care-avoidant behaviors, particularly among women of childbearing age.

Translational/Human Health Impact: Early integration with mental health services to address severe anxiety symptoms could potentially improve retention in SUD recovery programs, thereby improving outcomes.

Video

Slides

|2022-08-31T17:25:20-04:00August 23rd, 2022|2022 Annual Meeting Presentations|Comments Off on Hodges, Matt: Associations of Mental Health Measures and Retention in a Community-Based Perinatal Care Recovery Support Program for Women of Childbearing Age with Substance Use Disorder

About the Author:

James Dudley

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