Review: A comparison of China’s risk communication in response to SARS and H7N9 using principles drawn from international practice

Home/Review: A comparison of China’s risk communication in response to SARS and H7N9 using principles drawn from international practice

Review: A comparison of China’s risk communication in response to SARS and H7N9 using principles drawn from international practice

Review: A comparison of China’s risk communication in response to SARS and H7N9 using principles drawn from international practice

This research article posits that building trust and facilitating multi-sector collaborations by using open and honest communication and actively engaging stakeholders is essential for dealing with public health crises.

By learning from, and improving upon, risk communication practices from previous pandemics, leaders can lessen adverse social impacts. Improving outcomes during the emergency management of public health crises relies on trust. This trust can be improved if stakeholders collaborate and share knowledge in a timely manner and provide useful information available when needed. Specifically, results from in-depth interviews with key informants and government and medical experts along with analysis of peer-reviewed literature indicate 8 key risk communication principles:

  • Develop trust
  • Be transparent
  • Make announcements early
  • Listen well
  • Plan well
  • Be honest and open
  • Be empathetic and caring
  • Accept and involve the public as a partner
|2020-04-30T10:21:54-04:00April 30th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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