Review: CDC Interim guidance for implementing safety practices for critical infrastructure workers possibly exposed to COVID-19

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Review: CDC Interim guidance for implementing safety practices for critical infrastructure workers possibly exposed to COVID-19

Review: CDC Interim guidance for implementing safety practices for critical infrastructure workers possibly exposed to COVID-19

The CDC released new guidance on April 8, 2020 regarding safety practices for critical infrastructure workers who may have had exposure to a person with suspected or confirmed COVID-19.

Unlike the old guidance which suggested that workers stay home for 14 days if they have been exposed to a person with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, the new guidance suggests temperature checks prior to the employee entering the workplace, self-monitoring, wearing a facemask or employer approved cloth face coverings for 14 days after exposure, 6 feet social distancing, and frequent disinfecting of work spaces. If a critical infrastructure worker becomes sick with COVID-19 symptoms, they should immediately leave the workspace and exposed workers should follow the exposure protocol described above.

The CDC defines critical infrastructure workers as the following:

  • Federal, state, & local law enforcement
  • 911 call center employees
  • Fusion Center employees
  • Hazardous material responders from government and the private sector
  • Janitorial staff and other custodial staff
  • Workers – including contracted vendors – in food and agriculture, critical manufacturing, informational technology, transportation, energy and government facilities
|2020-04-09T08:15:02-04:00April 8th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: CDC Interim guidance for implementing safety practices for critical infrastructure workers possibly exposed to COVID-19

About the Author: Seema Mohapatra

Seema Mohapatra
Seema Mohapatra is an Associate Professor of Law and Dean's Fellow at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, She teaches Introduction to Health Care Law and Policy, Genetics and the Law, Torts, and Bioethics and the Law. Seema Mohapatra is an expert in the areas of health care law, public health law, bioethics, torts, and international health and family law. Her research interests include the intersection of biosciences and the law, assisted reproduction and surrogacy, international family and health law, health care disparities in the United States, and informed consent. Her work has been published in several journals, including the Wake Forest Law Review, Colorado Law Review, Brooklyn Law Review, and the Harvard Journal of Law & Policy. Professor Mohapatra currently teaches Torts, Introduction to Health Care Law, Bioethics, and Genetics and the Law. She has authored articles and book chapters on topics such as insurance coverage of infertility and assisted reproduction, genetics and health privacy, international surrogacy laws, and equity in healthcare coverage. Professor Mohapatra regularly presents her research nationally and internationally at legal and medical conferences and symposia. Prior to teaching, Professor Mohapatra practiced health law in Chicago at Sidley & Austin and Foley & Lardner. She earned a J.D. degree from Northwestern University School of Law and has a master’s degree in Public Health with a concentration in Chronic Disease Epidemiology from Yale University. She earned a bachelor of arts in Natural Sciences (with a minor in Women's Studies) from Johns Hopkins University.

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