Review: COVID-19 pandemic: Knowledge and perceptions of the public and healthcare professionals

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Review: COVID-19 pandemic: Knowledge and perceptions of the public and healthcare professionals

Review: COVID-19 pandemic: Knowledge and perceptions of the public and healthcare professionals

This research article determined a critical need to improve the knowledge and perceptions of COVID-19 among health care workers.

With the mounting COVID-19 transmissions raising tensions, it is important to determine how information is managed to help frontline health care workers during this public health crisis. Although knowledge and perceptions varied among different types of health care workers, overall, this study revealed that health care workers have insufficient knowledge about COVID-19 but positive perceptions of COVID-19 prevention transmission. A third of health care workers depended on official government websites for their primary source of information about COVID-19, which means they should be receiving accurate information. It also provides a rationale for these authentic sources to post up-to-date information. Of concern, however, is that nearly two-thirds of health care workers rely on social media for information, which has been shown to disseminate an abundance of misinformation and disinformation. As the global threat of COVID-19 continues, educational campaigns targeting health care workers to address gaps in information sources, poor knowledge levels, and discrepancies in perceptions is urgently needed.

|2020-06-24T09:31:17-04:00June 24th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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