Review: Creating new solutions to tackle old problems: The first ever evidence-based guidance on emergency risk communication policy and practice

Home/Review: Creating new solutions to tackle old problems: The first ever evidence-based guidance on emergency risk communication policy and practice

Review: Creating new solutions to tackle old problems: The first ever evidence-based guidance on emergency risk communication policy and practice

Review: Creating new solutions to tackle old problems: The first ever evidence-based guidance on emergency risk communication policy and practice

This article describes evidence-based recommendations for utilizing risk communication as a powerful intervention.

One of the most essential, but challenging, emergency interventions during a pandemic is risk communication. It is imperative to ensure real-time exchange of information between public health experts, government officials, and at-risk populations. This allows people an opportunity to understand and adopt protective behaviors. To assist with this process, the World Health Organization (WHO) published evidence-based guidance on the policy and practice of emergency risk communication. A summary of recommendations includes:

  • Building trust and engaging with affected populations (this includes communicating uncertainty)
  • Integrating emergency risk communication into health and emergency response systems (this includes coordinating information systems and designating strategic roles)
  • Planning strategic risk communication practices (this includes using consistent, understandable messaging through preferred social media and traditional channels)
|2020-04-28T12:02:43-04:00April 28th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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