Review: Design for extreme scalability: A wordless, globally scalable COVID-19 prevention animation for rapid public health communication

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Review: Design for extreme scalability: A wordless, globally scalable COVID-19 prevention animation for rapid public health communication

Review: Design for extreme scalability: A wordless, globally scalable COVID-19 prevention animation for rapid public health communication

This commentary proposes that public health agencies need to use simple, globally accessible messaging strategies and delivery platforms to communicate about COVID-19.

Novel public health communication interventions must grab the public’s attention, share information on platforms where people get their information, and disseminate reliable messages accessible to all regardless of language, age, or education level. This communication must occur quickly so there is less time for misinformation to manifest. Relying on best practices from communication theory, entertainment-education, and commercial animation, the authors share three important points to help health communicators with health messaging that they learned from their development of a wordless, globally scalable COVID-19 prevention animation:

  1. Rapid design of broad-reaching health communication interventions is necessary and can be accomplished without sacrificing quality or accuracy of health messaging.
  2. Distilling messages to their simplest form must be a priority.
  3. Health messages can be made broadly compelling when globally deployable interventions are needed.
|2020-05-21T08:24:40-04:00May 20th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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