Review: Don’t get it or don’t spread it? Comparing self-interested versus prosocially framed COVID-19 prevention messaging

Home/Review: Don’t get it or don’t spread it? Comparing self-interested versus prosocially framed COVID-19 prevention messaging

Review: Don’t get it or don’t spread it? Comparing self-interested versus prosocially framed COVID-19 prevention messaging

Review: Don’t get it or don’t spread it? Comparing self-interested versus prosocially framed COVID-19 prevention messaging

This study supports the use of prosocial framing to persuade individuals to engage in behaviors to slow the rate of COVID-19 transmission.

Many messages exist to try to convince people to engage in preventive behaviors, such as social distancing and handwashing, to slow the transmission of COVID-19. This study assessed the framing of messages to determine if self-interest, prosocial, or a combination of both messages are more effective in gaining compliance. All messages increased intentions to engage in the desired behaviors compared to receiving no information; however, the pro-social message alone had the largest effect. Prosocial motives are a major driver of intentions to prevent infection suggesting that policymakers must tap into the morality of helping others instead of encouraging behaviors that focus on individual benefit, which may appear selfish

|2020-04-05T10:14:55-04:00April 4th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Don’t get it or don’t spread it? Comparing self-interested versus prosocially framed COVID-19 prevention messaging

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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