Review: Dynamics of interorganizational public health emergency management networks: Following the 2015 MERS response in South Korea

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Review: Dynamics of interorganizational public health emergency management networks: Following the 2015 MERS response in South Korea

Review: Dynamics of interorganizational public health emergency management networks: Following the 2015 MERS response in South Korea

This research article provides recommendations for government agencies responding to virus outbreaks after analyzing risk communication during the MERS outbreak.

Interorganizational communication is important when responding to novel infectious disease outbreaks like COVID-19. All levels of government agencies play important roles in responding to public health epidemics. National leaders must effectively coordinate and support the overall response, and local and state leaders must interact with other governmental agencies to appropriately respond. Broadly speaking, government agencies need to improve hierarchical communication with different government levels, horizontal communication and cooperation with similar levels, and information systems overall. Specifically, government agencies need to disclose information more quickly and clearly and agree on priorities and information standards and systems.

|2020-04-30T10:21:38-04:00April 30th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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