Review: Fatalism in the context of COVID-19: Perceiving coronavirus as a death sentence predicts reluctance to perform recommended preventative behaviors

Home/Review: Fatalism in the context of COVID-19: Perceiving coronavirus as a death sentence predicts reluctance to perform recommended preventative behaviors

Review: Fatalism in the context of COVID-19: Perceiving coronavirus as a death sentence predicts reluctance to perform recommended preventative behaviors

Review: Fatalism in the context of COVID-19: Perceiving coronavirus as a death sentence predicts reluctance to perform recommended preventative behaviors

This research article found that individuals who associated coronavirus with death were less likely to perform recommended preventative health behaviors.

Knowing what predicts individuals’ likelihood of engaging in recommended COVID-19 preventative behaviors is important so they can be targeted in health messages to increase compliance. Researchers explored a novel idea by assessing the correlation between fatalism related to coronavirus and recommended preventative behaviors such as social distancing and handwashing. They found that coronavirus-related worry, age, race, perceived ability to take sick leave, and work-related self-esteem predicted people’s association of COVID-19 with death. This association actually negatively predicted intentions to perform recommended behaviors. Public health officials and care providers can use this information to target and frame health communication messages and interventions that combat fatalism for more effective compliance.

|2020-06-18T11:14:13-04:00June 18th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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