Review: Ideological health spirals: An integrated political and health communication approach to COVID interventions

Home/Review: Ideological health spirals: An integrated political and health communication approach to COVID interventions

Review: Ideological health spirals: An integrated political and health communication approach to COVID interventions

Review: Ideological health spirals: An integrated political and health communication approach to COVID interventions

This article describes a new comprehensive, theory-driven model for messaging that takes into consideration the politically polarized responses to the COVID-19 threat.

Researchers have created the ideological health spirals model (IHSM) to holistically explain the relationships between individual-level characteristics and political, media, and sociological contexts that influence an individuals’ likelihood of engaging in specific health-related behaviors. The focus is on identity-based motivations and how they interact with fragmented media environments and socially sorted interpersonal contexts to create discrepancies in individuals’ communication experiences that inform specific health behaviors. These interactions influence behavioral, normative, and efficacy beliefs, which in turn affect behaviors. Building off of social identity theory and the theory of reasoned action, the IHSM enables researchers to determine the most effective communication strategies for encouraging recommended behaviors.

|2020-06-09T11:54:38-04:00June 9th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

Get Involved with Indiana CTSI