Review: Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on ST‐elevation myocardial infarction in a non‐COVID-19 epicenter

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Review: Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on ST‐elevation myocardial infarction in a non‐COVID-19 epicenter

Review: Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on ST‐elevation myocardial infarction in a non‐COVID-19 epicenter

This study found that during the COVID-19 pandemic, patients presenting for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were more likely to present late and have lower left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) on presentation.  

  • From January 1, 2020, to April 15, 2020, 143 STEMIs were identified across our integrated 18‐hospital system.
  • The cut-off for pre‐ and post‐COVID‐19 cohorts was March 23rd, 2020, when stay‐at‐home orders were initiated in Ohio.
  • Compared with the pre‐COVID‐19 cohort, post‐COVID‐19 patients had a significantly lower initial LVEF (45 [34–50] vs. 50% [40–60], = .015)
  • 11/35 patients with STEMI in the post-COVID group presented > 12 hr after symptoms onset. Of these, 27% avoided the ED due to fear of COVID‐19, 18% believed symptoms were COVID‐19 related, and 9% did not want to burden the ED given the COVID‐19 pandemic
  • Among post‐COVID‐19 patients, those with >12‐hr delay in presentation had a longer average door-to-balloon time (88 vs. 53 min, = .033) and higher peak troponin (58 vs. 8.5 ng/ml, = .03)
|2020-06-04T09:36:59-04:00June 3rd, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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