Review: “Keep it short and sweet” Improving risk communication to family physicians during public health crises

Home/Review: “Keep it short and sweet” Improving risk communication to family physicians during public health crises

Review: “Keep it short and sweet” Improving risk communication to family physicians during public health crises

Review: “Keep it short and sweet” Improving risk communication to family physicians during public health crises

This research study provides recommendations for public health officials for improving risk communication with health care providers during a public health crisis.

Researchers interviewed family physicians in Canada who had experienced public health crises (e.g., SARS and H1N1 outbreaks) to learn what recommendations they have about how to improve risk communication to physicians during public health crises. Most notably, physicians want a single source of trustworthy information that is timely, succinct, and feasible for integrating into their daily practice. Risk communicators should consider the distinct needs of its learners and communicate via appropriate outlets, which can include social media given its expediency. They desire having helpful information to give to patients and recommend increasing the collaboration between public health organizations and frontline health providers.

|2020-04-24T11:17:27-04:00April 24th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: “Keep it short and sweet” Improving risk communication to family physicians during public health crises

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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