Review: Knowledge, perception, and capacity regarding emergency risk communication: A cross-sectional survey of 429 county health emergency response staff in Chongqing, China

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Review: Knowledge, perception, and capacity regarding emergency risk communication: A cross-sectional survey of 429 county health emergency response staff in Chongqing, China

Review: Knowledge, perception, and capacity regarding emergency risk communication: A cross-sectional survey of 429 county health emergency response staff in Chongqing, China

This letter to the editor suggests that emergency risk communication is the most effective strategy for providing information to individuals and communities to make the best possible decisions in crisis events.

Ambiguity in responsibility is a prominent issue that hinders improvement in emergency preparedness capacity for public health works, which is something that has been evident in China for a number of years. In general, there is typically a lack of knowledge about emergency risk communication, negative attitudes towards it, and limited capability among staff. Still, it appears to be the most effective. Therefore, training must be implemented to enhance people’s awareness of emergency and their response capacity. By using appropriate and targeted emergency risk communication, the impact of public health emergencies can be reduced and personal safety and social stability can be promoted in all countries.

|2020-04-22T11:45:46-04:00April 22nd, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Knowledge, perception, and capacity regarding emergency risk communication: A cross-sectional survey of 429 county health emergency response staff in Chongqing, China

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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