Review: Letter to the editor: Risk communication, shared responsibility, and mutual trust are matters: Real lessons from closure of Eunpyeong St. Mary’s Hospital due to coronavirus disease 2019 in Korea

Home/Review: Letter to the editor: Risk communication, shared responsibility, and mutual trust are matters: Real lessons from closure of Eunpyeong St. Mary’s Hospital due to coronavirus disease 2019 in Korea

Review: Letter to the editor: Risk communication, shared responsibility, and mutual trust are matters: Real lessons from closure of Eunpyeong St. Mary’s Hospital due to coronavirus disease 2019 in Korea

Review: Letter to the editor: Risk communication, shared responsibility, and mutual trust are matters: Real lessons from closure of Eunpyeong St. Mary’s Hospital due to coronavirus disease 2019 in Korea

In this letter to the editor, epidemiologists provide three principles of the dealing with hospital transmission of COVID-19.

Based on the perspectives of epidemiological investigators of a hospital closure in Korea due to COVID-19, three principles are offered for dealing with hospital transmission of the virus:

  1. Risk communication should be clearer and more straightforward (be open with decisions and rationales for decisions)
  2. Stakeholders should share responsibility in the crisis (exchange opinions and share decisions)
  3. Stakeholders should build mutual trust in the crisis (understand and respect multiple roles)

Risk communication, shared responsibility, and building mutual trust are the most important lessons learned from the COVID-19 outbreak at Eunpyeong St. Mary’s Hospital and those principles should be followed during this crisis.

|2020-04-29T09:00:03-04:00April 29th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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