Review: Measuring the outreach efforts of public health authorities and the public response on Facebook during the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020: A cross-country comparison

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Review: Measuring the outreach efforts of public health authorities and the public response on Facebook during the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020: A cross-country comparison

Review: Measuring the outreach efforts of public health authorities and the public response on Facebook during the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020: A cross-country comparison

In this study, researchers discovered that Singapore was the most active in communicating with the public via Facebook, but the United States and England provided more accurate information.

Researchers conducted a comparative analysis of three countries’ public health authorities Facebook pages to determine trends and strategies. Singapore’s Ministry of Health (MOH) was the most active on Facebook, averaging four posts daily, and included the most diverse topics related to COVID-19. The United States’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and England’s Public Health England (PHE) posts were mostly related to preventive measures and did not include any false information, unlike posts on Singapore’s social media site. Although the CDC had the most comments to its posts, the MOH had the most favorable responses. Toxic comments for all three sites were fairly low. The authors recommend being active on social media sites, providing accurate information, and monitoring responses to inform and engage the community.

|2020-07-10T07:11:22-04:00June 15th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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