Review: Performance of SARS-CoV-2 antibody assays in different stages of the infection: Comparison of commercial ELISA and rapid tests

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Review: Performance of SARS-CoV-2 antibody assays in different stages of the infection: Comparison of commercial ELISA and rapid tests

Review: Performance of SARS-CoV-2 antibody assays in different stages of the infection: Comparison of commercial ELISA and rapid tests

This study compared 4 commercial ELISAs and 2 rapid tests for detecting antibodies in individuals with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and found that while test sensitivities were low within the first 5 days, by >10 days, all evaluated tests provided positive results >10 days post disease onset. 

  • Compared tests:
    • Four ELISAs – Euroimmun SARS-CoV-2 IgA and IgG, Wantai SARS-CoV-2 IgM and total antibodies
    • Two rapid tests (Wantai SARS-CoV-2 Ab Rapid Test and 2019-nCoV IgG/IgM Rapid Test)
  • Serum or plasma from 77 symptomatic patients with acute SARS-CoV-2 infection, who were diagnosed by positive PCR were used
  • Serum samples from 100 indivdiuals without SARS-CoV-2 served as controls
  • Sensitivities were low (<40%) within the first 5 days post disease onset, IgM-, IgA- and total antibody-ELISAs increased in sensitivity to >80% between the 6th and 10th day post symptom onset. The evaluated tests (including IgG and rapid tests) provided positive results in ALL patients >10th day post onset of disease.
  • Specificities were 83% and 98% for the Euroimmun IgA and IgG and 97% for the Wantai IgM and the Ab ELISAs, respectively
  • The Wantai Rapid Test displayed a specificity of 98%, and the 2019-2019-nCoV IgG/IgM Rapid Test 100% for IgM and IgG respectively
|2020-06-02T11:22:14-04:00June 1st, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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