Review: SARS-CoV-2 and Guillain-Barré syndrome: AIDP variant with favorable outcome

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Review: SARS-CoV-2 and Guillain-Barré syndrome: AIDP variant with favorable outcome

Review: SARS-CoV-2 and Guillain-Barré syndrome: AIDP variant with favorable outcome

This case series described 3 patients with typical Guillain-Barre Syndrome preceded by symptoms of (and biologically confirmed) COVID-19, with neurological symptoms appearing within the first 22 days of COVID-19 symptoms. 

  • Patients from Geneva and Lausanne University Hospitals, Switzerland, between March and April 2020
  • All patients presented with distal paresthesias and rapidly progressive limb weakness, evolving to either moderate tetraparesis (n =2) or tetraplegia (n=1) and areflexia (n=3) within the first five days.
  • All showed classic demyelinating pattern
  • One required mechanical ventilation
  • Neurological symptoms appeared  at 7, 15 and 22 days after the appearance of typical COVID-19 related symptoms
  • Initial RT-PCR swab +SAR-CoV-2 on initial swab for two patients, third patient showed seroconversion and a 4th swap was positive.
  • All received IVIG
  • One patient was discharged, one now walks with assistance, the third is bed-bound but can rise to stand up.
|2020-06-03T11:07:03-04:00June 2nd, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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