Review: Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2–specific antibodies among adults in Los Angeles County, California, on April 10-11, 2020

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Review: Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2–specific antibodies among adults in Los Angeles County, California, on April 10-11, 2020

Review: Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2–specific antibodies among adults in Los Angeles County, California, on April 10-11, 2020

This study found that 4.34% of individuals within Los Angeles County, CA had positive antibodies for SARS-COV-2.

  • This study performed serologic tests in a community sample to estimate cumulative incidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection
  • Of 1952 individuals invited to participate in antibody testing, 1702 (87.2%) provided consent and 865 (50.9%) were tested, introducing likelihood of selection bias
  • Highest rates of positive IgM and IgG were in populations who were male, Black, or had symptoms in the prior 2 months
  • The estimate implies that approximately 367 000 adults had SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, which is substantially greater than the 8430 cumulative number of confirmed infections in the county on April 10.
|2020-05-19T11:54:55-04:00May 19th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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