Review: Smell and taste symptom‐based predictive model for COVID‐19 diagnosis

Home/Review: Smell and taste symptom‐based predictive model for COVID‐19 diagnosis

Review: Smell and taste symptom‐based predictive model for COVID‐19 diagnosis

Review: Smell and taste symptom‐based predictive model for COVID‐19 diagnosis

A new study suggests that smell or taste change, particularly in combination with fever and/or myalgia, is a strong predictor of COVID-19.The authors conducted an anonymous electronic survey that was publicized through social media to query participants with COVID-19 testing. Respondents were questioned regarding 10 presenting symptoms, demographic information, comorbidities, and COVID-19 test results. They used stepwise logistic regression to identify predictors for COVID positivity.They examined answers from 145 participants with positive COVID-19 testing and 157 participants with negative results. Participants had a mean age of 39 years, and 214 (72%) were female.

Smell or taste change, fever, and body ache were associated with COVID-19 positivity, and shortness of breath and sore throat were associated with a negative test result (p<0.05). A model using all 5 diagnostic symptoms had the highest accuracy with a predictive ability of 82% in discriminating between COVID-19 results.

To maximize sensitivity and maintain fair diagnostic accuracy, a combination of 2 symptoms, change in sense of smell or taste and fever was found to have a sensitivity of 70% and overall discrimination accuracy of 75%.

They concluded that smell or taste change is a strong predictor for a COVID-19 positive test result. Using the presence of smell or taste change with fever, this parsimonious classifier correctly predicted 75% of COVID-19 test results in this small cohort.

|2020-05-06T09:15:20-04:00May 5th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Erika Cheng

Erika Cheng

Get Involved with Indiana CTSI