Review: Social media for rapid knowledge dissemination: early experience from the COVID‐19 pandemic

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Review: Social media for rapid knowledge dissemination: early experience from the COVID‐19 pandemic

Review: Social media for rapid knowledge dissemination: early experience from the COVID‐19 pandemic

This editorial highlights the importance of disseminating information graphically via social media for rapid uptake by health care providers.

Individuals are facing a challenge of transferring knowledge about current best practices to people who need it most – frontline health care workers. Preventing infection and promoting psychological well-being is essential during a pandemic, especially when negative effects can be exacerbated by uncertainty. In order to disseminate information at a rate equal to or quicker than the spread of the virus itself, free open access education materials disseminated via appropriate social media channels should be utilized. One effective way to transmit this information is through well-designed infographics that are clear, concise, and practical. This communication tool has been shown to increase message retention. Successful dissemination will be affected by existing reputation of the disseminator, quality of infographic images and content, and rapid dissemination by social media platforms with professional participants.

|2020-04-08T16:13:56-04:00April 8th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Social media for rapid knowledge dissemination: early experience from the COVID‐19 pandemic

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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