Review: Social media has seen a rise in misinformation during COVID-19. How can you learn to spot it?

Home/Review: Social media has seen a rise in misinformation during COVID-19. How can you learn to spot it?

Review: Social media has seen a rise in misinformation during COVID-19. How can you learn to spot it?

Review: Social media has seen a rise in misinformation during COVID-19. How can you learn to spot it?

This public radio story provides tips for deciphering between accurate and inaccurate information on social media.

During this public radio news story, a representative from the News Literacy Project shared the tools created for students to evaluate news stories circulating on social media platforms. Because misinformation can spread rapidly, it is important to recognize misinformation and know that messages have been designed to not only reinforce someone’s beliefs but to exploit them. This misinformation spreads quickly because people trust their friends more than the media or government so when misinformation is shared by a friend, it is easier to believe that it must be true because people think of their friends as credible sources. It is recommended to learn to separate scrolling from intentional news consumption. Slowing down and checking to see if claims are backed by evidence from other reputable outlets can reduce the tendency to simply believe that well-produced looking material is credible.

|2020-07-23T08:03:48-04:00July 23rd, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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