Review: The novel coronavirus (COVID-2019) outbreak: Amplification of public health consequences by media exposure

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Review: The novel coronavirus (COVID-2019) outbreak: Amplification of public health consequences by media exposure

Review: The novel coronavirus (COVID-2019) outbreak: Amplification of public health consequences by media exposure

This commentary suggests that repeated media exposure to public health crises can lead to negative acute and long-term health consequences; thus, government and health leaders must provide accurate information in responsible ways.

During a health crisis, individuals need accurate and up-to-date information to make informed decisions. Timely updates from trusted sources (e.g., local health agencies, service providers) are critical for providing risk assessments and recommendations. Strategic traditional and social media use are effective ways for agencies to communicate accurate information during crises. It is imperative that facts be conveyed without sensationalism or graphic images because content, type, and amount of media exposure affect psychological and physical responses to community-wide traumatic events. It is recommended that individuals use trusted government social media sites, such as the CDC and WHO, for the most accurate and least physically and psychologically harmful information. Additionally, health care providers are trusted community agents and therefore, should communicate essential information and concrete suggestions during public health crises.

|2020-04-06T09:36:12-04:00April 6th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: The novel coronavirus (COVID-2019) outbreak: Amplification of public health consequences by media exposure

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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