Review: The two trillion dollar barn: science, prevention, and the lessons of disaster

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Review: The two trillion dollar barn: science, prevention, and the lessons of disaster

Review: The two trillion dollar barn: science, prevention, and the lessons of disaster

This commentary argues that the public health community must use the COVID-19 pandemic to promote a science-based policy agenda using honest and transparent communication to build international collaborations for advancing the common good of humanity.

The author argues that with COVID-19 we are facing the most cataclysmic failure of public health in generations. This is due to inadequate funding for prevention efforts; hostility towards science, particularly public health science; a deceptive and misinformed government; and disdain for collaboration among international communities. However, to be successful, public health leaders must depend on a scientific system that is open, honest, trustworthy, and cooperative. Through all the failures, many lessons have been learned from COVID-19, particularly that we must rely on prevention and scientific principles to face the daunting challenges that lie ahead, even after the pandemic fades. Communicating openly and honestly with policymakers and the public will improve public health worldwide.

|2020-07-01T08:40:44-04:00July 1st, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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