Review: Urgent need for individual mobile phone and institutional reporting of at home, hospitalized, and intensive care unit cases of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection

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Review: Urgent need for individual mobile phone and institutional reporting of at home, hospitalized, and intensive care unit cases of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection

Review: Urgent need for individual mobile phone and institutional reporting of at home, hospitalized, and intensive care unit cases of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection

This article argues for the immediate use of mobile phones and public reporting systems to combat the COVID-19 pandemic.

To decrease the spread of COVID-19, accurate reporting of cases is needed to characterize the epidemiological parameters underlying transmission and to identify effective control and mitigation strategies. Innovative methods of reporting and surveillance are required. Critical information such as results of testing and actions taken could be achieved by self-reporting through free downloadable mobile phone applications. This communicative strategy should supplement a mandatory, uniform, daily reporting of hospital censuses of confirmed COVID-19 cases, which is argued to be the only method to understand clustering and immediate hospital needs. Worldwide public reporting systems already exist to make these recommendations a reality.

|2020-04-13T12:26:53-04:00April 13th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Urgent need for individual mobile phone and institutional reporting of at home, hospitalized, and intensive care unit cases of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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