Review: When fear and misinformation go viral: Pharmacists’ role in deterring medication misinformation during the ‘infodemic’ surrounding COVID-19

Home/Review: When fear and misinformation go viral: Pharmacists’ role in deterring medication misinformation during the ‘infodemic’ surrounding COVID-19

Review: When fear and misinformation go viral: Pharmacists’ role in deterring medication misinformation during the ‘infodemic’ surrounding COVID-19

Review: When fear and misinformation go viral: Pharmacists’ role in deterring medication misinformation during the ‘infodemic’ surrounding COVID-19

This commentary argues that pharmacists are uniquely positioned to combat the spread of COVID-19 misinformation by providing accurate and reliable information to the public and other health professionals.

To minimize the detrimental consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, individuals need access to, and understand, accurate and reliable information. Pharmacists have a unique role in fighting against medication misinformation in particular. Pharmacists can contribute by:

  • Providing updated, evidenced-based scientific advice
  • Providing appropriate information through social media
  • Counseling communities on treatments
  • Guiding the public towards reliable information sources
  • Conducting health education campaigns
  • Collaborating with other health professionals to facilitate educational and behavioral interventions
  • Advising communities of risks
|2020-05-21T08:26:08-04:00May 20th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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