Review: Where have all the fractures gone? The epidemiology of pediatric fractures during the COVID-19 pandemic

Home/Review: Where have all the fractures gone? The epidemiology of pediatric fractures during the COVID-19 pandemic

Review: Where have all the fractures gone? The epidemiology of pediatric fractures during the COVID-19 pandemic

Review: Where have all the fractures gone? The epidemiology of pediatric fractures during the COVID-19 pandemic

This retrospective cohort study found a 2.5-fold decrease in pediatric fracture volume during the COVID-19 pandemic, partially because of cessation of organized sports and decreased playground use.

  • Study compared acute fractures presenting to a single level I pediatric trauma hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic with fractures during a prepandemic period at the same institution. The “pandemic” cohort was gathered from March 15 to April 15, 2020 and compared with a “prepandemic” cohort from the same time window in 2018 and 2019.
  • In total, 1745 patients presenting with acute fractures were included
  • The incidence of fractures presenting during the pandemic  decreased from 22.5±9.1 per day to  9.6±5.1 per day (P<0.001).
  • The presenting age for all fractures decreased during the pandemic from 9.4±4.4 years to 7.5±4.3 years (P<0.001) largely due to the decreased fracture burden among adolescents.
  • During the pandemic, there was an increase in the proportion of injuries occurring at home (57.8% vs. 32.5%, P<0.001) or on bicycles (18.3% vs. 8.2%, P<0.001), but a decrease in those related to sports (7.2% vs. 26.0%, P<0.001) or playgrounds (5.2% vs. 9.0%, P<0.001).
  • There was no increase in time-to-presentation.
|2020-05-22T11:02:16-04:00May 21st, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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