Events Calendar

Events Calendar2022-03-24T14:12:04-04:00
Apr
19
Fri
2024
ATP Seminar: Improving Translational Value in Rodent Behavior Studies @ Zoom
Apr 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Improving Translational Value in Rodent Behavior Studies

Speakers: Wendy A. Koss, Ph.D.
Hosted by: Purdue Animal Behavior Core

Description: In vivo rodent behavior studies have been criticized for having poor translation to human disease. This is primarily due to high failure rates in drug discovery research. Reasons could be poor construct, mechanistic or face validity, and inaccurate interpretations of results. The development of rodent behavior cores may help bridge the translational gap by developing new models and by having behavior experts to reduce poor interpretations and ensure validity. Core facilities can also develop standard protocols to be used across institutions and disciplines. Here we will discuss ways to increase the translational value of rodent behavior tasks by discussing the need for standardize protocols and newer tasks, like touchscreen tests that can mimic tests performed by humans and machine learning to identify other behaviors that our current methods are not able to detect.

May
3
Fri
2024
ATP Seminar: Development and Universal Application of Artificial Intron Technology for the Generation of Conditional Alleles in Mice @ Zoom
May 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Development and Universal Application of Artificial Intron Technology for the Generation of Conditional Alleles in Mice

Speakers: Stephane Pelletier, Ph.D., Director of the Indiana University Genome Editing Center
Hosted by: Indiana University Genome Editing Center

Description: Engineering conditional alleles in mice has historically posed a challenge. However, in a recent proof-of-concept study, we made significant progress using a novel technology that employs a short artificial intron to create conditional alleles in mice. This innovative method, based on the Cre-loxP system, involves inserting a short DNA segment containing basic intron elements flanked by loxP sites within an exon. Under normal circumstances (without Cre), this DNA segment functions as an intron and is efficiently removed during splicing, allowing normal gene expression. Conversely, in the presence of Cre, the intronic sequences are specifically excised, leaving a short DNA segment within the exon. Consequently, this altered DNA segment evades recognition by the splicing machinery, resulting in gene inactivation. Our findings expand the potential of this approach for engineering conditional alleles in mice, and ongoing investigations aim to evaluate its universality.

Apr
19
Fri
2024
ATP Seminar: Improving Translational Value in Rodent Behavior Studies @ Zoom
Apr 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Improving Translational Value in Rodent Behavior Studies

Speakers: Wendy A. Koss, Ph.D.
Hosted by: Purdue Animal Behavior Core

Description: In vivo rodent behavior studies have been criticized for having poor translation to human disease. This is primarily due to high failure rates in drug discovery research. Reasons could be poor construct, mechanistic or face validity, and inaccurate interpretations of results. The development of rodent behavior cores may help bridge the translational gap by developing new models and by having behavior experts to reduce poor interpretations and ensure validity. Core facilities can also develop standard protocols to be used across institutions and disciplines. Here we will discuss ways to increase the translational value of rodent behavior tasks by discussing the need for standardize protocols and newer tasks, like touchscreen tests that can mimic tests performed by humans and machine learning to identify other behaviors that our current methods are not able to detect.

May
3
Fri
2024
ATP Seminar: Development and Universal Application of Artificial Intron Technology for the Generation of Conditional Alleles in Mice @ Zoom
May 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Development and Universal Application of Artificial Intron Technology for the Generation of Conditional Alleles in Mice

Speakers: Stephane Pelletier, Ph.D., Director of the Indiana University Genome Editing Center
Hosted by: Indiana University Genome Editing Center

Description: Engineering conditional alleles in mice has historically posed a challenge. However, in a recent proof-of-concept study, we made significant progress using a novel technology that employs a short artificial intron to create conditional alleles in mice. This innovative method, based on the Cre-loxP system, involves inserting a short DNA segment containing basic intron elements flanked by loxP sites within an exon. Under normal circumstances (without Cre), this DNA segment functions as an intron and is efficiently removed during splicing, allowing normal gene expression. Conversely, in the presence of Cre, the intronic sequences are specifically excised, leaving a short DNA segment within the exon. Consequently, this altered DNA segment evades recognition by the splicing machinery, resulting in gene inactivation. Our findings expand the potential of this approach for engineering conditional alleles in mice, and ongoing investigations aim to evaluate its universality.

Get Involved with Indiana CTSI