Review: Are gun shops or their employees “essential”? Department of Homeland Security says yes; Pennsylvania Supreme Court says no

Home/Review: Are gun shops or their employees “essential”? Department of Homeland Security says yes; Pennsylvania Supreme Court says no

Review: Are gun shops or their employees “essential”? Department of Homeland Security says yes; Pennsylvania Supreme Court says no

Review: Are gun shops or their employees “essential”? Department of Homeland Security says yes; Pennsylvania Supreme Court says no

The DHS designated firearm shop employees essential, while Pennsylvania, New York and Massachusetts have challenged.

The Department of Homeland Security issued guidance recently designated firearm shop employees essential workers. Last week, a split Pennsylvania Supreme Court denied a petition by advocates to overturn the governor’s decision to not list firearm shops as “essential.” The Department of Homeland Security states that their list is “advisory in nature” and should not be considered as a federal standard or directive.” Furthermore, DHS states that “Individual jurisdictions should add or subtract essential workforce categories based on their own requirements and discretion.” It is unclear whether the federal guidance will influence state determinations of what constitute “essential” services; however, the Pennsylvania Governor did later update the state’s list of essential services to include gun shops. Other states, including New York and Massachusetts, continue to not include shops selling firearms or ammunition on their list of “essential” businesses or services.

|2020-04-01T09:41:50-04:00March 31st, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Are gun shops or their employees “essential”? Department of Homeland Security says yes; Pennsylvania Supreme Court says no

About the Author: Ross Silverman

Ross Silverman
Ross D. Silverman, JD, MPH, is Professor of Health Policy and Management at Indiana University Fairbanks School of Public Health and Professor of Public Health and Law at Indiana University McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis. He is a member of the IU Centers on Health Policy and Bioethics. His research focuses on public health and medical law, policy, and ethics, and law's impact on health outcomes and vulnerable populations. He also serves as Associate Editor on Legal Epidemiology for Public Health Reports, the official journal of the Office of the U.S. Surgeon General and the U.S. Public Health Service. His most recent Covid-19 publications include: "Ensuring Uptake of Vaccines Against SARS-CoV-2" in the New England Journal of Medicine (with MM Mello & SB Omer), and "Covid-19: control measures must be equitable and inclusive" in BMJ (with ZD Berger, NG Evans & AL Phelan)

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