Review: COVID-19 – why Germany’s case fatality rate seems so low

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Review: COVID-19 – why Germany’s case fatality rate seems so low

Review: COVID-19 – why Germany’s case fatality rate seems so low

Germany has the third highest number of coronavirus cases in Europe, but deaths are relatively few when compared with neighboring countries. This article explains why.

As of 2 April official statistics showed that 872 deaths from COVID-19 had been recorded in Germany from 73 522 confirmed cases, translating to a fatality rate of 1.2%. This compares with fatality rates of 11.9% in Italy, 9% in Spain, 8.6% in the Netherlands, 8% in the UK, and 7.1% in France.

This article discusses potential reasons for Germany’s low fatality rate, including:

  • Early and high level of testing among a wide sample of the German population, which identified milder cases in younger people.
  • The availability of testing at quality controlled laboratories throughout the country.
  • Early action to focused on social distancing, including banning gatherings of people and isolating people who had COVID-19 or were exposed to it.
  • Rules banning more than two people who lived in different households from being outside together, and mandating that people at supermarkets, pharmacies, doctor’s offices, and banks stay 1.5 to 2 metres apart.
  • Adherence to contact restrictions by the majority of people in Germany
|2020-04-10T16:24:53-04:00April 10th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: COVID-19 – why Germany’s case fatality rate seems so low

About the Author: Erika Cheng

Erika Cheng

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