Review: Decision-making during a crisis: the interplay of narratives and statistical information before and after crisis communication

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Review: Decision-making during a crisis: the interplay of narratives and statistical information before and after crisis communication

Review: Decision-making during a crisis: the interplay of narratives and statistical information before and after crisis communication

In this study, individuals were more influenced by information presented as a narrative than just by statistical information.

This study explored how types of information influence people’s behaviors during a crisis situation. Presenting information as a narrative has a persuasive effect on individuals’ decision-making behaviors. Narratives are most effective when information about the situation matches the narrative’s content. Activating affective responses (e.g., stress, anxiety) strongly affects decision behaviors. Narratives trigger a more heuristic way of processing information, which affects decision-making. This study demonstrated that narratives, either on their own or coupled with statistical information, are more effective at getting people to engage in specific behaviors than simply presenting statistical information alone.

|2020-04-02T07:55:36-04:00April 2nd, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Decision-making during a crisis: the interplay of narratives and statistical information before and after crisis communication

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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