Review: Decline in child vaccination coverage during the COVID-19 pandemic — Michigan care improvement registry, May 2016–May 2020

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Review: Decline in child vaccination coverage during the COVID-19 pandemic — Michigan care improvement registry, May 2016–May 2020

Review: Decline in child vaccination coverage during the COVID-19 pandemic — Michigan care improvement registry, May 2016–May 2020

This study found up-to-date vaccination coverage from children 24 months of age and younger declined in all age cohorts except the birth-dose hepatitis B coverage. 

  • Among children aged 5 months, up-to-date status for all recommended vaccines declined from approximately two thirds of children during 2016–2019 (66.6-67.9%) to fewer than half (49.7%) in May 2020. For the 16-month age cohort, coverage with all recommended vaccines declined, with measles-containing vaccination coverage decreasing from 76.1% in May 2019 to 70.9% in May 2020.
  • Furthermore, up-to-date series coverage for each age cohort (1, 3, 5, 7, 16, 19, and 24 months) assessed in May 2020 was lower for Medicaid-enrolled children than for those children not enrolled in Medicaid.
    • The largest difference was in the age 7 months cohort assessed in May 2020; in that cohort, 34.6% of Medicaid-enrolled children were up-to-date for their recommended series, compared with 55.0% of children not enrolled in Medicaid
  • In summary, the observed declines in vaccination coverage might leave young children and communities vulnerable to vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles. If measles vaccination coverage of 90%–95% (the level needed to establish herd immunity) is not achieved, measles outbreaks can occur. Concerted efforts are needed to ensure rapid catch-up for children who are not up-to-date with measles-containing vaccines as well as other ACIP-recommended vaccinations
|2020-05-19T11:50:21-04:00May 18th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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