Review: Effective health risk communication about pandemic influenza for vulnerable populations

Home/Review: Effective health risk communication about pandemic influenza for vulnerable populations

Review: Effective health risk communication about pandemic influenza for vulnerable populations

Review: Effective health risk communication about pandemic influenza for vulnerable populations

This article provides approaches to influenza pandemic communication that considers targeted population’s risk reduction strategies.

Effective communication must successfully instruct, inform, and motivate appropriate self-protective behavior, update risk information, build trust in officials, and dispel rumors. Pandemic communication should maximize the public’s capacity to encourage prevention, promote containment, and foster resilience and recovery. The quality of societal response depends partly on meeting the specific communication needs of all populations. Inappropriate communication can greatly compromise risk reduction. With rapidly changing and potentially ambiguous information, trust in officials is crucial. To improve trust, messages need to be culturally appropriate and consider health literacy levels, language, cultural references, and readability issues. Overall, communication strategies and messages are most effective when they come from the target population’s perspective, are sensitive and relevant to audience needs, and are integrated based on factual information.

|2020-05-01T09:10:03-04:00May 1st, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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