Review: Evidence informing the UK’s COVID-19 public health response must be transparent

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Review: Evidence informing the UK’s COVID-19 public health response must be transparent

Review: Evidence informing the UK’s COVID-19 public health response must be transparent

This commentary highlights the need to review evidence from effective public health interventions in other countries and to be transparent with why public health decisions are being implemented to gain trust and action of citizens.

The WHO-China Joint Mission on Coronavirus Disease clearly demonstrates that only immediate and decisive public health initiatives work to prevent or delay the spread of COVID-19. Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea achieved relative control over the coronavirus by implementing widespread testing, contact tracing, and state-imposed social distancing. The UK is one country that has opted not to implement as many population-level interventions, leaving health care providers, scientists, and citizens to question why. Transparency is key to helping people understand and retain information as well as cooperate and trust the recommendations being suggested.

|2020-04-17T08:08:54-04:00April 17th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Evidence informing the UK’s COVID-19 public health response must be transparent

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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