Review: Information overload and infodemic in the COVID-19 pandemic

Home/Review: Information overload and infodemic in the COVID-19 pandemic

Review: Information overload and infodemic in the COVID-19 pandemic

Review: Information overload and infodemic in the COVID-19 pandemic

This commentary highlights challenges of, and offers suggestions for avoiding, information overload and infodemic problems.

Unlike any previous pandemics, COVID-19 has brought about a new set of challenges in the current digital age – information overload and an infodemic with false news, conspiracy theories, and racist ideologies. The authors provide numerous suggestions for information consumers, including the following:

  • Visit only authentic and official websites such as WHO, CDC, and John Hopkins University
  • Do not keep a daily count of national and global cases of COVID-19, and do not regularly share this information via social media
  • Verify any suspicious information with a fact-checking website
  • Do not believe and share claims of miracle cures and homemade remedies
  • Health professionals should not share overwhelming research files and presentations
  • Avoid inflammatory or racist posts targeting specific groups of people
  • Reduce time spent reading, watching, and listening to COVID-19 related news
|2020-06-25T11:20:41-04:00June 25th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

Get Involved with Indiana CTSI