Review: Letter to the editor: Headline stress disorder caused by Netnews during the outbreak of COVID‐19

Home/Review: Letter to the editor: Headline stress disorder caused by Netnews during the outbreak of COVID‐19

Review: Letter to the editor: Headline stress disorder caused by Netnews during the outbreak of COVID‐19

Review: Letter to the editor: Headline stress disorder caused by Netnews during the outbreak of COVID‐19

This letter to the editor reports on the health effects of exposure to new coverage of COVID-19 and offers recommendations for government and public health officials to lessen public anxiety.

“Headline stress disorder” is a highly emotional response to endless news reports of anxiety-inducing crises. This has been documented in the United States following the Ebola outbreak and in Nigeria with the monkeypox outbreak. Now, with the insurgence of COVID-19, China is witnessing the same disorder. To help lessen stress and anxiety, it is recommended that media disseminate information that increases knowledge and prevention efforts but avoids sensationalizing the epidemic. The government and public health organizations have a responsibility to provide timely, accurate information on their official media platforms. To reduce the likelihood of individuals experiencing physical and psychological stress experienced in other parts of the world, the United States should implement these communicative suggestions.

|2020-04-15T16:36:42-04:00April 7th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Letter to the editor: Headline stress disorder caused by Netnews during the outbreak of COVID‐19

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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