Review: Severe obesity is associated with higher in-hospital mortality in a cohort of patients with COVID-19 in the Bronx, New York

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Review: Severe obesity is associated with higher in-hospital mortality in a cohort of patients with COVID-19 in the Bronx, New York

Review: Severe obesity is associated with higher in-hospital mortality in a cohort of patients with COVID-19 in the Bronx, New York

This retrospective study assessed the characteristics and early outcomes of 200 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in the Bronx, focusing on obesity as a risk factor for poor outcomes.

Using multivariate analysis, the authors found that severe obesity (BMI≥35), male sex, and age≥65 were each independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality, intubation rates, and increasing oxygen requirements during hospital stay. Specifically, individuals with severe obesity were 3.78 times more likely die than individuals with normal weight. Former or current smoking was found to be independently associated to increasing oxygen requirements during hospital stay.

Characteristics of the 200 patient cohort included:

  • 102 (51%) were female
  • 102 (51%) were African American
  • The median BMI was 30 kg/m2.
  • The median age was 64 years.
  • The 3 most common comorbidities were hypertension (76%), hyperlipidemia (46.2%), and diabetes (39.5%)
  • The most common symptoms were fever (86%), cough (76.5%), and dyspnea (68%)
  • 24% died during hospitalization (BMI<25 kg/m2: 31.6%, BMI 25-34 kg/m2: 17.2%, BMI≥35 kg/m2: 34.8%, p= 0.03)

 

|2020-05-21T08:23:42-04:00May 19th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Erika Cheng

Erika Cheng

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