Review: Understanding and addressing sources of anxiety among health care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic

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Review: Understanding and addressing sources of anxiety among health care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic

Review: Understanding and addressing sources of anxiety among health care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic

In this opinion piece, physicians provide suggestions for leaders to support health care professionals based on their experience and direct requests from other health care providers.

To support health care professionals so that they are able to provide the best possible care to their patients and communities over an extended period of time, it is important to first understand specific sources of anxiety. Tailored stress reduction and resilience approaches are more effective than general strategies. The best way to do this is to ask health care professionals what they are most concerned about. Health care professionals want unambiguous assurances that their organization will support them and their family and can be categorized into five requests: hear me, protect me, prepare me, support me, and care for me. Beyond these tangible actions to address their concerns, health care professionals want visible leaders who understand their concerns, assure them that they recognize their concerns, and develop plans to mitigate their concerns. Having leaders communicate care and gratitude is the encouragement health care professionals need during this time of uncertainty.

|2020-04-13T08:48:34-04:00April 13th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Understanding and addressing sources of anxiety among health care professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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