Review: A towering Babel of risk information in the COVID-19 pandemic: Trust and credibility in risk perception and positive public health behaviors

Home/Review: A towering Babel of risk information in the COVID-19 pandemic: Trust and credibility in risk perception and positive public health behaviors

Review: A towering Babel of risk information in the COVID-19 pandemic: Trust and credibility in risk perception and positive public health behaviors

Review: A towering Babel of risk information in the COVID-19 pandemic: Trust and credibility in risk perception and positive public health behaviors

This editorial highlights the importance of trust and credibility of information sources to encourage behavioral compliance.

Risk perception is part of individuals’ decision-making processes, which ultimately affects behavior choices. Unfortunately, inconsistent messaging about health risks for COVID-19 among multiple, seemingly credible sources (e.g., World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, White House, local government officials and public health leaders) has led to non-compliance with recommended behavior changes. To influence the perceptions of risk and encourage individuals to comply with recommended behaviors, it is important to increase the trust and credibility of the source of the communication. Patients are turning to family physicians for reliable advice and reassurance and for guidance on what communication they can trust.

 

|2020-05-15T11:31:14-04:00May 15th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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