Review: Building local health department COVID-19 emergency and risk communications capacity

Home/Review: Building local health department COVID-19 emergency and risk communications capacity

Review: Building local health department COVID-19 emergency and risk communications capacity

Review: Building local health department COVID-19 emergency and risk communications capacity

This article highlights the necessity of local health departments to formulate effective risk communication plans to build resilient communities.

To make better informed decisions and to reduce distrust from the public, local public health departments must implement strategic risk communication plans to protect their communities. The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the need for leaders to recognize all critical communication channels and specifically to use social media more effectively. Local health departments should routinely communicate and engage with their audiences via social media by providing evidence-based information and avoiding misleading information. Combatting public health misinformation has actually become one of the most important tasks that local public health departments must include in their response plans. Still, they must not overlook traditional methods of disseminating information (e.g., press releases, public service announcements) while including innovative strategies into their plans. Developing the capacity to establish and sustain effective communication plans can help local health departments to better mitigate confusion, disseminate vital information, and protect communities.

|2020-07-01T11:48:13-04:00July 1st, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

Get Involved with Indiana CTSI