Review: Coronavirus may kill 100,000 to 240,000 in U.S. despite social distancing and personal hygiene actions, officials say

Home/Review: Coronavirus may kill 100,000 to 240,000 in U.S. despite social distancing and personal hygiene actions, officials say

Review: Coronavirus may kill 100,000 to 240,000 in U.S. despite social distancing and personal hygiene actions, officials say

Review: Coronavirus may kill 100,000 to 240,000 in U.S. despite social distancing and personal hygiene actions, officials say

This article discusses the President’s Coronavirus Task Force estimate that by strictly following extended social distancing and hygiene-related recommendations nationwide, the number of U.S. Coronavirus outbreak deaths can be held to 100,000, but that number could go much higher with poor adherence to or early abandonment of stay-at-home policies.

“I want every American to be prepared for the hard days that lie ahead….[W]e’re going to go through a very tough two weeks,” stated President Trump at the March 31, 2020 White House briefing on the pandemic. The administration, on March 29, had extended the government’s recommendations concerning social distancing through April 30, 2020.

In the last 24 hours, the governors of Florida and Texas, the two largest states that previously did not have statewide so-called “stay-at-home” orders in place, have signed orders that will stay in effect for at least the next 30 days. The Texas governor has called the state’s executive order an order “relating to statewide continuity of essential services and activities during the COVID-19 disaster.” He declined to call the order a “stay-at-home” or “shelter-in-place” order, arguing that such orders may cause confusion because (a) essential services would remain open, and (b) people could continue to leave their homes for a limited range of activities like grocery shopping and exercise.

|2020-04-01T15:57:07-04:00April 1st, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Coronavirus may kill 100,000 to 240,000 in U.S. despite social distancing and personal hygiene actions, officials say

About the Author: Ross Silverman

Ross Silverman
Ross D. Silverman, JD, MPH, is Professor of Health Policy and Management at Indiana University Fairbanks School of Public Health and Professor of Public Health and Law at Indiana University McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis. He is a member of the IU Centers on Health Policy and Bioethics. His research focuses on public health and medical law, policy, and ethics, and law's impact on health outcomes and vulnerable populations. He also serves as Associate Editor on Legal Epidemiology for Public Health Reports, the official journal of the Office of the U.S. Surgeon General and the U.S. Public Health Service. His most recent Covid-19 publications include: "Ensuring Uptake of Vaccines Against SARS-CoV-2" in the New England Journal of Medicine (with MM Mello & SB Omer), and "Covid-19: control measures must be equitable and inclusive" in BMJ (with ZD Berger, NG Evans & AL Phelan)

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