Review: Cultural orientation, power, belief in conspiracy theories, and intentions to reduce the spread of COVID-19

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Review: Cultural orientation, power, belief in conspiracy theories, and intentions to reduce the spread of COVID-19

Review: Cultural orientation, power, belief in conspiracy theories, and intentions to reduce the spread of COVID-19

This study suggests promoting collectivism to increase engagement with efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

By surveying more than 700 people about their views on individualism and collectivism, belief in conspiracy theories about COVID-19, feelings of powerlessness, and intentions to engage in behaviors to reduce the spread of COVID-19, researchers were able to determine collectivism positively predicted intentions to engage in recommended behaviors. Individualism, on the other hand, predicted lower intentions to engage in preventive behaviors. Additionally, findings revealed the importance of assessing the interplay between culture and both personal feelings (powerlessness) and information consumption (conspiracy theories) during times of crisis. Collectivism encourages a powerful response and individualism reduces that sense of power, which is often replaced with potentially harmful conspiracy theories. Clearly communicating that “we are all in this together” may be the most persuasive message for this pandemic.

|2020-07-06T09:34:49-04:00July 6th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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