Review: Health communication through news media during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak in China: A digital topic modeling approach

Home/Review: Health communication through news media during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak in China: A digital topic modeling approach

Review: Health communication through news media during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak in China: A digital topic modeling approach

Review: Health communication through news media during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak in China: A digital topic modeling approach

In this analysis of news articles, the researchers conclude that mass media news reports in China lag behind the development of COVID-19.

Initially, the Chinese media did not cover the first cases of COVID-19 in December 2019. News reports steadily increased and then rapidly increased at the end of January 2020 suggesting that mass media cannot capture an infectious disease outbreak in time to be a leading indicator of the epidemic. News reports lag behind real-time coronavirus developments, indicating that the media does not play an adequately forewarning function in public health communication. Mass media also conveyed misinformation, which induced fear, anger, and sadness among the public. Therefore, government and mass media need to determine suitable news themes with less harmful mental pressure, accurate information, and amount of information to disseminate to keep the public alert.

|2020-04-20T09:13:59-04:00April 20th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Health communication through news media during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak in China: A digital topic modeling approach

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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