Review: Unpacking the black box: How to promote citizen engagement through government social media during the COVID-19 crisis

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Review: Unpacking the black box: How to promote citizen engagement through government social media during the COVID-19 crisis

Review: Unpacking the black box: How to promote citizen engagement through government social media during the COVID-19 crisis

In this empirical study, researchers examined how Chinese central government agencies used social media to promote citizen engagement during the COVID-19 crises.

In times of crises, citizens care more about content than imagery, but social media posts with images encourage more citizen engagement. Using a dialogic loop (e.g., hashtags, posed questions) to interact with the public allows government agencies to demonstrate their concern for public interests, ideas, and suggestions, which then allows the public to feel valued and recognized. This sense of belonging to government agencies and their social media communities provides important motivation for continued engagement. Additionally, government agencies should use artificial intelligence and cloud computing technologies to analyze public demand during different stages of crisis to modify their messaging to meet public information needs.

|2020-04-20T09:14:41-04:00April 20th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Unpacking the black box: How to promote citizen engagement through government social media during the COVID-19 crisis

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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