Review: [RETRACTED] Hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine with or without a macrolide for treatment of COVID-19: A multinational registry analysis

Home/Review: [RETRACTED] Hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine with or without a macrolide for treatment of COVID-19: A multinational registry analysis

Review: [RETRACTED] Hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine with or without a macrolide for treatment of COVID-19: A multinational registry analysis

Review: [RETRACTED] Hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine with or without a macrolide for treatment of COVID-19: A multinational registry analysis

THE ARTICLE DISCUSSED HAS BEEN RETRACTED. CLICK HERE TO SEE THE RETRACTION NOTICE.

A multinational registry analysis found no evidence of benefit of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine when used either alone or with a macrolide. 

  • Using an international, observational registry across six continents, the study assessed 96,032 patients with COVID-19, of whom 14,888 were treated with hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, or their combination with a macrolide.
  • To minimize the effect of confounding factors, a propensity score matching analysis was done individually for each of the four treatment groups compared with a control group that received no form of that therapy. For each treatment group, a separate matched control was identified using exact and propensity-score matched criteria with a calliper of 0·001.
  • After controlling for age, sex, race or ethnicity, underlying comorbidities, and disease severity at baseline, the use of all four regimens was associated increased risk for:
    • De-novo ventricular arrhythmia in hospital: Compared with the control group (0·3%), hydroxychloroquine alone (6·1%; HR 2·369, 95% CI 1·935–2·900), hydroxychloroquine with a macrolide (8·1%; 5·106, 4·106–5·983), chloroquine alone (4·3%; 3·561, 2·760–4·596), and chloroquine with a macrolide (6·5%; 4·011, 3·344–4·812)
    • In-hospital mortality: Compared with the control group (9·3%), hydroxychloroquine alone (18·0%; HR 1·335, 95% CI 1·223–1·457), hydroxychloroquine with a macrolide (23·8%; 1·447, 1·368–1·531), chloroquine alone (16·4%; 1·365, 1·218–1·531), and chloroquine with a macrolide (22·2%; 1·368, 1·273–1·469).
  • Limitations: This study should be interpreted cautiously. Because this was an observational study design, there may have been unmeasured confounding factors
|2020-06-19T17:24:49-04:00May 28th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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