Review: Infodemic management: a key component of the COVID-19 global response

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Review: Infodemic management: a key component of the COVID-19 global response

Review: Infodemic management: a key component of the COVID-19 global response

This article discusses the importance of using trusted channels of communication to present accurate, trusted information to counter circulating misinformation about COVID-19.

The Internet has proven to be a powerful tool for disseminating information, misinformation, and disinformation during the COVID-19 pandemic. To combat the incorrect information circulating, two strategies have been able to neutralize negative effects:

  • Increase the proportion of accurate information to at least a 60:40 ratio to misinformation
  • Educate at least 20% of people vulnerable to misinformation so they do not act on or share the misinformation

To help manage this infodemic phenomenon, the World Health Organization (WHO) has launched the WHO Information Network for Epidemics (EPI-WIN), which disseminates large volumes of evidence-based information. By identifying and working with trusted sources of information, WHO guides these key “amplifiers” on creating appropriate messages and educational materials to reach their communities. Tailoring messages to specific sectors (e.g., health care, travel and tourism, faith-based organizations, food and agriculture, general public) is vital during this time.

|2020-04-27T13:31:39-04:00April 27th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|Comments Off on Review: Infodemic management: a key component of the COVID-19 global response

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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