Review: Mental health, risk factors, and social media use during the COVID-19 epidemic and cordon sanitaire among the community and health professionals in Wuhan, China: Cross-sectional survey

Home/Review: Mental health, risk factors, and social media use during the COVID-19 epidemic and cordon sanitaire among the community and health professionals in Wuhan, China: Cross-sectional survey

Review: Mental health, risk factors, and social media use during the COVID-19 epidemic and cordon sanitaire among the community and health professionals in Wuhan, China: Cross-sectional survey

Review: Mental health, risk factors, and social media use during the COVID-19 epidemic and cordon sanitaire among the community and health professionals in Wuhan, China: Cross-sectional survey

This study cautions against spending too much time on social media for COVID-19 information because of its possible link to anxiety and depression.

One-fifth of the general population and one-fifth of the health professional population in China reported anxiety and depression, and about one-third of each of these populations spent more than two hours per day consuming COVID-19 information on social media. Caution is warranted when searching social media for COVID-19 news given the infodemic and emotional contagion disseminated through online platforms. However, the internet may be used positively by monitoring the effect of the pandemic on mental health (possibly thorough online social support) and by restoring daily routines and telemedicine opportunities.

|2020-05-22T11:08:48-04:00May 22nd, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Maria Brann

Maria Brann
Dr. Maria Brann, PhD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and affiliate faculty with the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University. She explores the integration of health, interpersonal, and gender communication. Her translational focus and mixed methods approach are woven throughout her health vulnerabilities research, which advocates for more effective communication to improve people’s health and safety. Her primary research interests focus on the study of women’s and ethical issues in health communication contexts and promotion of healthy lifestyle behaviors to improve personal and public health and safety. She researches communication at both the micro and macro levels and studies how communication influences relationships among individuals and with the social world.

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