Review: Monitoring COVID-19 through trends in influenza-like illness and laboratory-confirmed Influenza and COVID-19 – New York State, excluding New York City, January 1 – April 12, 2020

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Review: Monitoring COVID-19 through trends in influenza-like illness and laboratory-confirmed Influenza and COVID-19 – New York State, excluding New York City, January 1 – April 12, 2020

Review: Monitoring COVID-19 through trends in influenza-like illness and laboratory-confirmed Influenza and COVID-19 – New York State, excluding New York City, January 1 – April 12, 2020

In this study, the diagnosis of influenza-like illness trends with both influenza (which was decreasing up until March) and COVID-19  (which began sharply increasing in March). In 3 of the 4 regions of New York State (not including NYC), the diagnoses of ILI increased ahead of the emergence of COVID-19.

  • Influenza-like illness (ILI) is defined as fever of 100°F or greater with cough and/or sore throat in the absence of another known cause
  • Used two sources for data:
    • Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet)- For ILI prevalence
    • NY State Department of Health database- influenza types A-B and SARS-CoV-2 tests from state-wide laboratories are reported to this database
  • Until the emergence of COVID-19 in early March, ILI and laboratory-confirmed influenza tracked closely together, with both declining.
  • Afterwards, in the Metropolitan region of NYS region, with the highest rates of confirmed COVID-19, ILI increased most sharply.
  • In the other three regions, ILI increased ahead of the emergence of COVID-19. This might signal early COVID-19 activity without diagnosis in those regions or increased concern over COVID-19 and care-seeking among people with mild ILI
|2020-06-02T11:21:28-04:00June 1st, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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