Weekly Review: COVID-19 Data and Surveillance – June 14, 2021

Weekly Review: COVID-19 Data and Surveillance – June 14, 2021

This brief from Nature discusses mass vaccinations and its effects on the spread of COVID-19 in children.  Data from the small town of Serrana in the Brazilian state of Sao Paulo indicate that adult vaccinations are a protective factor against infection spread in children.  In the town, 98% of adults have been vaccinated with CoronaVac and the town is the site of Project S, which measures the effectiveness of the vaccine.  The most recent data revealed that symptomatic cases dropped by 80% and mortality by 95%.  A similar reduction was seen in unvaccinated children.  This is a very interesting finding as only 62% of the town’s 45,000 residents are adults.  Israel and the U.S. have also seen similar reductions.   In England, however, data suggests that children might still be important spreaders as during the month of May, there were nearly 100 outbreaks in primary and secondary schools.  Researchers conclude that schools most likely are not hotpots for infection spread.  This is seen by worldwide data which indicate that outbreaks in schools since the onset of the pandemic have been uncommon even when there were high levels of community infection.  There are mixed reactions regarding whether children should be vaccinated for a disease where severe infection is rare.  Others, however, see the need to vaccinate children as this would be a crucial step in controlling the pandemic.

|2021-06-14T08:26:02-04:00June 14th, 2021|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Payal Patel-Dovlatabadi

Payal Patel-Dovlatabadi
Payal Patel-Dovlatabadi, DrPH, MPH, MBA is an Associate Professor of Public Health and Director of the undergraduate and graduate programs in public health at the University of Evansville. She serves as the public health expert for local media and has appeared on over 100 televised interviews regarding various public health issues with over 50 of the interviews related to COVID-19. Her research interests include healthcare systems and policies in the comparative perspective related to social epidemiology.

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